Get To Know Nepal Guide Hari Khadka

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With nine years of guiding experience under his belt, Nepal guide Hari Khadka likes to crack jokes on his tours and make sure his clients feel relaxed. Hari started his own company, Welcome Nepal Treks & Tours P.Ltd, in 2010, and he promotes homestays in Nepal to encourage ecotourism.
How did you get into guiding in Nepal? How did you make the transition to becoming a tour guide?

I had a dream to become a tour guide so I started doing guiding. After my Bachelor’s degree, I decided to start in this field. I did my Bachelor’s and Master’s in Management. I completed it in 2012. I was guiding with my friend’s company from 2006. After a few years, I started my own company in 2010. I built up my knowledge from my studies and working in this field, helping and interacting with people. I love to meet new people from all over the world..

Have you got a certain style of guiding, or do you just run with it on the day?

Yes, I have pre-trip meetings with briefings, then we start the trip. I get up early in the morning, about 5:30 am, then after half an hour I go for a morning walk for 30 minutes then, back home. I get ready for the office at 7:00 am then have breakfast near the office somewhere at a restaurant. Then, if I have a group, I will go sightseeing, if not, I start work at the office for website promotion or office work.

How are you doing after the earthquake? How is Nepal going? Should people still travel to the country or should they hold off to let Nepal recover?

After the earthquake, I am not very busy so in my leisure time, I’m just helping earthquake victims and promoting Nepal like this. Now Nepal is going on well, everything is becoming normal. Yes, people should travel to Nepal now. Sometimes, with my friend, I go on a hiking tour or go to the village of earthquake victims and help. Most of the days, I come to the office and do promotion for the website.

What is the best part of your job?

I am friendly and funny so I will make my guests happy. We joke while we sit for lunch as well. I normally never force a time schedule or anything, so they will always feel very relaxed.

You have developed eco-tourism in Nepal in the past five years – what have you done specifically, and why is this important in Nepal?

I have been promoting homestays and making some packages to show our culture, such as Shivaratri. Homestay programs mean that in some parts of a village we have created a homestay package so if a guest wants to know about Nepali culture, traditions, and to eat real traditional Nepali food, then it’s a great idea for this.

When we promote homestay programs, the local people will have money, they can earn money from tourism, then they will feel they want to save nature and the environment. That is why they will have awareness about saving the environment.

How many times do you get asked about Mt. Everest and what’s the strangest question you’ve been asked about it? How important is the mountain to Nepal?

Thousands of times I get asked about Mt. Everest. For me, the strangest question is, ‘I am an older person, I can’t walk much but may I do the Mt. Everest base camp trekking?’ Without the mountain, I can’t imagine Nepal tourism.

What must first time travellers to Nepal see or do and why? What dish should they taste and why?

First time travellers in Nepal must see Kathmandu Durbar Square. It’s historically very famous and much of Nepal’s culture is contained in the square, such as Kal Bhairav, the Living Goddess (Kumari), and many more temples as well.

The first time traveller should taste a typical traditional Nepali dinner. There will be a variety of courses, for example, first they will serve traditional Nepalese rice wine; if they want to try this, they can. Then some snacks such as fried potatoes, some fish, Nepalese dumplings and bean soup. At the same time, they can see and enjoy the traditional Nepali dancing and singing. After almost one hour, then they will get the main course, which means main Nepali foods such as rice, meat, pickle, curry, etc. At the end, they will get dessert. A common dessert would be shikarni, made of milk, for the traditional Nepali dinner.

How many languages do you speak? What is a good phrase for travellers to Nepal to learn and why?

I speak Nepali, Hindi and English.

‘Namaste’ – it’s like hello, it’s a Nepali language, everyone can understand it.

What is your favourite thing/place to see or do in Nepal and why?

Pokhara is my favourite place to see. It’s one of the most beautiful cities in the world and you get a beautiful view of the Himalayas.

Every job has its ups and downs. Are there any aspects of your job that you don’t like or aren’t that keen on?

It doesn’t feel like that.

As an experienced guide yourself, can you explain to our readers what the benefits of hiring a guide are?

If you hire a guide, it would be best, because you get lots of knowledge, everything will be on time, and systematic.

In your view, what makes a good tour guide?

Some surprises make a good tour guide. This means if somebody has a birthday, we manage that free of charge at the hotel or restaurant, or we will provide more sightseeing as well on the way without extra charge.

If you like this, you might also like Explore Nepal.

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